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What to do when you're burned out on climbing? - Aicacia Young

 
What to do when you're burned out on climbing? - Aicacia Young
What to do when you're burned out on climbing? - Aicacia Young
What to do when you're burned out on climbing? - Aicacia Young
What to do when you're burned out on climbing? - Aicacia Young
What to do when you're burned out on climbing? - Aicacia Young
What to do when you're burned out on climbing? - Aicacia Young
 
August 19, 2013 -  Aicacia Young    
 

Summer is coming to an end, and fall is quickly approaching. I’ve been staying in the gym for most of the summer due to the crazy heat here in Austin, but it’s finally starting to cool off a little. I’m getting psyched on climbing outdoors again, and working on some fun projects. I took a month or two off from climbing at the beginning of the summer, mostly just from a lack of ambition, and I feel like it’s definitely helped. You always see articles about how to get past your plateaus and how to reignite your passion for climbing, but sometimes you just need a break from something in order to truly miss it.

When I first started climbing, I never understood how more experienced climbers could grow tired of climbing. I always imagined that I would stay hooked forever if I could just get stronger. I did stay psyched for about a year and a half before I experienced a plateau, but then I hit a mental wall. I’ve managed the ebb and flow of my climbing ambitions for about 3 years now, and I’ve found that it’s usually best for me to just go with the flow. Once I get burned out on climbing, it’s most effective for me to engage in other enjoyable activities and put climbing on hold. Then, I tend to miss projecting, working toward my goals, adrenaline rushes, beta debates, and my rough, calloused skin.

If you’re going through a plateau or lacking the ambition to climb, you can try to fight it, or you can ride it out. Nothing in life stays constant; everything changes. There is no reason why your hobbies should be any different. Taking a week, month, or year off of climbing cannot strip you of your ability to climb and enjoy life. Never let anyone convince you otherwise. You do NOT have to climb 365 days a year in order to be considered a “real” climber. Ignore the elitists and embrace your climbing ambitions. If it’s truly a passion, you will always come back to it.

Here are some pictures of what I do when I'm not on the rock.

 
 

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